Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/76084
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Type: Journal article
Title: Stressful life events and the brain-derived neurotrophic factor gene in bipolar disorder
Author: Hosang, G.
Uher, R.
Keers, R.
Cohen-Woods, S.
Craig, I.
Korszun, A.
Perry, J.
Tozzi, F.
Muglia, P.
McGuffin, P.
Farmer, A.
Citation: Journal of Affective Disorders, 2010; 125(1-3):345-349
Publisher: Elsevier Science BV
Issue Date: 2010
ISSN: 0165-0327
1573-2517
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Georgina M. Hosang, Rudolf Uher, Robert Keers, Sarah Cohen-Woods, Ian Craig, Ania Korszun, Julia Perry, Federica Tozzi, Pierandrea Muglia, Peter McGuffin and Anne E. Farmer
Abstract: BACKGROUND: Gene-environment interactions may contribute to the high heritability of bipolar affective disorder. The aim of the present study was to examine the interplay between the BDNF Val(66)Met polymorphism and stressful life events (SLEs) in bipolar disorder. METHOD: A total of 1085 participants were recruited, including 487 bipolar I cases and 598 psychiatrically healthy controls. All participants completed the List of Threatening Life Events Questionnaire; bipolar subjects reported the events that occurred 6 months leading up to their worst manic episode and 6 months prior to their worst depressive episode, controls recorded events experienced 6 months before interview. The sample was genotyped for the BDNF Val(66)Met polymorphism (rs6265). RESULTS: Both Met carrier BDNF genotype and SLEs were significantly associated with the worst depressive episode of bipolar disorder. For the worst depressive episodes the effects of SLEs were also significantly moderated by BDNF genotype (gene x environment interaction). LIMITATIONS: The use of a self report questionnaire to measure stressful life events may increase recall inaccuracies, therefore caution should be taken when interpreting these results. DISCUSSION: The findings of this study highlight the importance of the interplay between genes and the environment in bipolar disorder.
Keywords: Humans; Genetic Predisposition to Disease; Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor; Heterozygote Detection; Life Change Events; Bipolar Disorder; Epistasis, Genetic; Genotype; Polymorphism, Genetic; Alleles; Social Environment; Adult; Middle Aged; Female; Male
Rights: © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved
RMID: 0020124164
DOI: 10.1016/j.jad.2010.01.071
Appears in Collections:Psychiatry publications

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