Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/63831
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Type: Journal article
Title: Early metallosis-related failure after total knee replacement: a report of 15 cases
Author: Willis-Owen, C.
Keene, G.
Oakeshott, R.
Citation: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery: British Volume, 2011; 93(2):205-209
Publisher: British Editorial Society of Bone Joint Surgery
Issue Date: 2011
ISSN: 0301-620X
2044-5377
Statement of
Responsibility: 
C. A. Willis-Owen, G. C. Keene and R. D. Oakeshott
Abstract: Metallosis is a rare cause of failure after total knee replacement and has only previously been reported when there has been abnormal metal-on-metal contact. We describe 14 patients (15 knees) whose total knee replacement required revision for a new type of early failure caused by extensive metallosis. A modification of a cementless rotating platform implant, which had previously had excellent long-term survival, had been used in each case. The change was in the form of a new porous-beaded surface on the femoral component to induce cementless fixation, which had been used successfully in the fixation of acetabular and tibial components. This modification appeared to have resulted in metallosis due to abrasive two-body wear. The component has subsequently been recalled and is no longer in use. The presentation, investigation, and findings at revision are described and a possible aetiology and its implications are discussed.
Keywords: Synovial Membrane
Humans
Foreign Bodies
Prosthesis Failure
Metals
Inflammation Mediators
Arthroscopy
Arthroplasty, Replacement, Knee
Postoperative Period
Reoperation
Retrospective Studies
Prosthesis Design
Knee Prosthesis
Aged
Aged, 80 and over
Middle Aged
Female
Male
Biomarkers
Rights: © 2011 British Editorial Society of Bone and Joint Surgery
DOI: 10.1302/0301-620X.93B2.25150
Appears in Collections:Aurora harvest
Orthopaedics and Trauma publications

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