Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/65661
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Type: Journal article
Title: Weight-bearing-induced displacement and migration over time of fracture fragments following split depression fractures of the lateral tibial plateau: A case series with radiostereometric analysis
Author: Solomon, L.
Callary, S.
Stevenson, A.
Mc Gee, M.
Chehade, M.
Howie, D.
Citation: Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery-British Volume, 2011; 93B(6):817-823
Publisher: British Editorial Soc Bone Joint Surgery
Issue Date: 2011
ISSN: 0301-620X
2044-5377
Statement of
Responsibility: 
L. B. Solomon, S. A. Callary, A. W. Stevenson, M. A. McGee, M. J. Chehade, D. W. Howie
Abstract: We investigated the stability of seven Schatzker type II fractures of the lateral tibial plateau treated by subchondral screws and a buttress plate followed by immediate partial weight-bearing. In order to assess the stability of the fracture, weight-bearing inducible displacements of the fracture fragments and their migration over a one-year period were measured by differentially loaded radiostereometric analysis and standard radiostereometric analysis, respectively. The mean inducible craniocaudal fracture fragment displacements measured -0.30 mm (-0.73 to 0.02) at two weeks and 0.00 mm (-0.12 to 0.15) at 52 weeks. All inducible displacements were elastic in nature under all loads at each examination during follow-up. At one year, the mean craniocaudal migration of the fracture fragments was -0.34 mm (-1.64 to 1.51). Using radiostereometric methods, this case series has shown that in the Schatzker type II fractures investigated, internal fixation with subchondral screws and a buttress plate provided adequate stability to allow immediate post-operative partial weight-bearing, without harmful consequences.
Keywords: Humans; Tibial Fractures; Tomography, X-Ray Computed; Treatment Outcome; Fracture Fixation, Internal; Bone Plates; Bone Screws; Weight-Bearing; Rotation; Adult; Middle Aged; Female; Male
Rights: Copyright © 2011 by British Editorial Society of Bone and Joint Surgery
RMID: 0020108756
DOI: 10.1302/0301-620X.93B6.26122
Appears in Collections:Orthopaedics and Trauma publications

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