Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/60422
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Type: Journal article
Title: Biomimetic hydroxyapatite coating on glass coverslips for the assay of osteoclast activity in vitro
Author: Wijenayaka, A.
Colby, C.
Atkins, G.
Majewski, P.
Citation: Journal of Materials Science-Materials in Medicine, 2009; 20(7):1467-1473
Publisher: Kluwer Academic Publ
Issue Date: 2009
ISSN: 0957-4530
1573-4838
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Asiri K. A. R. Wijenayak, Christopher B. Colby, Gerald J. Atkins and Peter Majewski
Abstract: The osteoclast (OC) is the cell type responsible for the resorption of bone. The activity of this cell is important in the aetiology of a large number of skeletal pathologies, and also for the biocompatibility and osseointegration of orthopaedic implant materials. OC mediated acid hydrolysis of calcium phosphate from the bone matrix offers a prime means of studying the biology and activity of this cell type. We have developed a method of coating glass coverslips with a hydroxyapatite (HA)-like mineral, using a biomimetic approach. Hydroxylation followed by formation of a self assembled monolayer (SAM) using the surfactant triethoxysilylpropyl succinic anhydride (TESPSA), allowed biomimetic deposition of HA-like mineral from a simulated body fluid (SBF). The biocompatibility of the TESPSA SAM-HA coated glass coverslips was tested by culturing human mature OC present in samples of giant cell tumour of bone (GCT). Parameters of OC activity were assayed, including F-actin ring formation, release of calcium and formation of osteoclastic resorption pits, confirming that OC were able to attach to and resorb the coated surface. This approach for the preparation of HA coatings on glass coverslips could have wide applicability for the study of osteoclast behaviour in vitro.
Keywords: Cells, Cultured; Osteoclasts; Humans; Bone Resorption; Hydroxyapatites; Glass; Coated Materials, Biocompatible; Microscopy; Image Enhancement; Cell Culture Techniques; Biomimetics; Cell Adhesion
Rights: © Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2009
RMID: 0020091202
DOI: 10.1007/s10856-009-3718-0
Appears in Collections:Orthopaedics and Trauma publications

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