Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/124883
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Type: Journal article
Title: Genetic and palaeo-climatic evidence for widespread persistence of the coastal tree species Eucalyptus gomphocephala (Myrtaceae) during the Last Glacial Maximum
Author: Nevill, P.
Bradbury, D.
Williams, A.
Tomlinson, S.
Krauss, S.
Citation: Annals of Botany, 2014; 113(1):55-67
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Issue Date: 2014
ISSN: 0305-7364
1095-8290
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Paul G. Nevill, Donna Bradbury, Anna Williams, Sean Tomlinson and Siegfried L. Krauss
Abstract: BACKGROUND AND AIMS:Few phylogeographic studies have been undertaken of species confined to narrow, linear coastal systems where past sea level and geomorphological changes may have had a profound effect on species population sizes and distributions. In this study, a phylogeographic analysis was conducted of Eucalyptus gomphocephala (tuart), a tree species restricted to a 400 × 10 km band of coastal sand-plain in south west Australia. Here, there is little known about the response of coastal vegetation to glacial/interglacial climate change, and a test was made as to whether this species was likely to have persisted widely through the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), or conforms to a post-LGM dispersal model of recovery from few refugia. METHODS:The genetic structure over the entire range of tuart was assessed using seven nuclear (21 populations; n = 595) and four chloroplast (24 populations; n = 238) microsatellite markers designed for eucalypt species. Correlative palaeodistribution modelling was also conducted based on five climatic variables, within two LGM models. KEY RESULTS:The chloroplast markers generated six haplotypes, which were strongly geographically structured (GST = 0·86 and RST = 0·75). Nuclear microsatellite diversity was high (overall mean HE 0·75) and uniformly distributed (FST = 0·05), with a strong pattern of isolation by distance (r(2) = 0·362, P = 0·001). Distribution models of E. gomphocephala during the LGM showed a wide distribution that extended at least 30 km westward from the current distribution to the palaeo-coastline. CONCLUSIONS:The chloroplast and nuclear data suggest wide persistence of E. gomphocephala during the LGM. Palaeodistribution modelling supports the conclusions drawn from genetic data and indicates a widespread westward shift of E. gomphocephala onto the exposed continental shelf during the LGM. This study highlights the importance of the inclusion of complementary, non-genetic data (information on geomorphology and palaeoclimate) to interpret phylogeographic patterns.
Keywords: Australian biogeography; climate change; coastal geomorphology; Eucalyptus gomphocephala; founder effects; Last Glacial Maximum; LGM; microsatellites; Myrtaceae; palaeodistribution modelling;, phylogeography; southern hemisphere; south-western Australia; tuart
Rights: © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved.
RMID: 1000018406
DOI: 10.1093/aob/mct253
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/arc/LP0669757
Appears in Collections:Environment Institute publications

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