Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://hdl.handle.net/2440/100297
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Type: Journal article
Title: Characterisation of the hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite from the weathering of illite in Jiujiang red earth sediments
Author: Yin, K.
Hong, H.
Churchman, G.
Li, Z.
Han, W.
Wang, C.
Citation: Soil Research, 2014; 52(6):554-561
Publisher: CSIRO Publishing
Issue Date: 2014
ISSN: 1838-675X
1838-6768
Statement of
Responsibility: 
Ke Yin, Hanlie Hong, Gordon Jock Churchman, Zhaohui Li, Wen Han, and Chaowen Wang
Abstract: The clay mineralogy and formation of hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite (HIV) in the Jiujiang red earth sediments were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometer (ICP-AES) analyses. The 1.4-nm peak of HIV did not change after Mg2+ saturation and glycol solvation, but it exhibited partial collapse to 1.0nm after K+ saturation followed by heat treatment at successively higher temperatures. HIV was also characterised by FTIR adsorption bands at ~3485 cm–1 and ~3415 cm–1, which did not change with increasing temperature. DSC analysis revealed that the dehydroxylation of hydroxides in the interlayer of HIV began at ~400C, and a further dehydroxylation was confirmed by the XRD of the sample heated to ~600C. The ICP-AES analysis of sodium citrate extracts showed that the Al concentration was higher than that of Fe, indicating that the Al was probably present as hydroxy-Al in the interlayer of HIV. The presence of hydroxy-Al polymers in the interlayer influenced both expandability and thermal properties of HIV clays from Jiujiang red earth sediments.
Keywords: climate; hydroxy-interlayered vermiculite; Jiujiang; mineralogy; red earth sediments
Rights: © CSIRO 2014
DOI: 10.1071/SR14014
Appears in Collections:Agriculture, Food and Wine publications
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